To Boldly Go Where No TSR PRO Has Gone Before

To Boldly Go Where No TSR PRO Has Gone Before

To Boldly Go Where No TSR PRO Has Gone Before
DTS TSR PRO onboard Artemis 1

We are proud to announce that a DTS TSR PRO data logger is traveling beyond the moon onboard Artemis 1, to help capture vital acceleration and vibration data that can help improve astronaut safety on the upcoming crewed mission, Artemis II.

Space, the final frontier… now, as we reach further into space, exploring that “final frontier” is no longer an if, but a when. With the recent launch of Artemis 1, part of NASA’s Artemis program developed to return us to the moon and beyond, we are that much closer to glimpsing more of what is ‘out there.’

Artemis 1, crewed by a manikin, is a mission of testing new technologies. The new technologies include the Space Launch Rocket (SLS) system, the most powerful rocket in the world. According to NASA1:

The crew is expected to experience 2.5 times the force of gravity during ascent and four times the force of gravity at two different points during the planned reentry profile. Engineers will compare Artemis I flight data with previous ground-based vibration tests with the same manikin, and human subjects, to correlate performance prior to Artemis II.

To help gather this data, the manikin’s seat is outfitted with sensors designed to record acceleration and vibration data during the mission. The DTS TSR PRO data logger, which is embedded in the seat back, is triggered to record when the hatch door closes. The vital acceleration data captured by the TSR PRO will help NASA better understand what forces astronauts may experience on Artemis II, the first scheduled crewed mission of the Orion spacecraft set for 2024.

“It’s critical for us to get data from the Artemis I manikin to ensure all of the newly designed systems, coupled with an energy dampening system that the seats are mounted on, integrate together and provide the protection crew members will need in preparation for our first crewed mission on Artemis II,” said Jason Hutt, NASA lead for Orion Crew Systems Integration.

The DTS TSR PRO is a compact rugged data logger that makes it easy to measure acceleration forces in extreme test environments such as rocket launches, space flight, and splashdowns. The data logger has a built-in data recorder and sensors and is self-powered for unattended monitoring of acceleration and vibration. When the hatch door of the capsule closes it triggers the TSR PRO to begin recording to capture that key data which can help contribute to astronaut safety on future missions. 

Congratulations NASA on this historical enterprise. We can’t wait to see what’s next!

To read more about the TSR PRO & NASA’s Artemis 1 Mission go to Taking the Next Leap to the Moon.

Resources
1. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/purposeful-passenger-artemis-i-manikin-helps-prepare-for-moon-missions-with-crew

November 16, 2022

NASA Kennedy Space Center Artemis 1 Orion
DTS TSR PRO Application Moonikin Artemis 1 Orion

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Taking the Next Leap to the Moon

Taking the Next Leap to the Moon

Taking the Next Leap to the Moon
DTS TSR PRO Application Moonikin Artemis 1 Orion

UPDATE: NASA successfully launched the Artemis 1 moon mission on the first Space Launch System rocket at 1:47 am EST (0647 GMT) on November 16, 2022.

On July 20, 1969, we made that first giant step and landed on the moon. Now, Artemis 1, part of a series of missions – missions that will bring us back to the moon and the hope of establishing a human presence there, is about to take off. The launch date for this historic event is scheduled for August 29. (UPDATE – the first two launch attempts were scrubbed due to issues NASA could not troubleshoot within the launch windows. “We do not launch until we think it’s right,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said.)

Lift off will be at NASA’s Kenny Space Center and Artemis 1 will be the first to use the most powerful rocket in the world, known as the Space Launch System Rocket (SLS) which will propel the Orion spacecraft for the first minutes of the mission. Artemis 1 will travel beyond the moon, further than any spacecraft built for humans has gone before. The 42-day duration mission will function as a demonstration of Orion’s systems prior to sending up a manned mission. Expected splashdown date is currently set for Oct. 10, 2022, at a reentry speed of 24,500 miles per hour – hotter and faster than any reentry before.

For these new missions, innovative technologies have had to be designed and tested. As part of assisting with future crew safety, the DTS TSR PRO data logger was used to help quantify the acceleration profile of the crew seat backs on launch. The closing of the hatch door triggers the TSR PRO to record and capture vital data which helps contribute to the success of these missions.

This first Artemis mission will be “manned” by Commander Moonikin Campos, a suited mannikin strapped in the commander’s seat on Orion. “Some data collected from Artemis I will be used for Orion crew simulations and to verify crew safety by comparing flight vibration and acceleration against pre-flight predictions, then making model refinements as necessary,” said Dr. Mark Baldwin, Orion’s occupant protection specialist for lead contractor Lockheed Martin.1

DTS would like to wish NASA and all organizations that have contributed to these upcoming missions, good luck! We are proud that DTS data acquisition equipment has been chosen by NASA for more than 3 decades to support their aerospace testing.

For more details on Artemis 1 and the moon missions go to https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis-i/.

Resources
1.https://www.nasa.gov/feature/purposeful-passenger-artemis-i-manikin-helps-prepare-for-moon-missions-with-crew

August 25, 2022

NASA Kennedy Space Center Artemis 1 Orion
DTS TSR PRO - Application Moonikin Artemis 1 Orion
NASA Kennedy Space Center Artemis 1 Orion

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DTS Named Best Place to Work for 3rd Year

DTS Named Best Place to Work for 3rd Year

DTS Named Best Place to Work for 3rd Year
DTS Best Places To Work OC 2022

For a third consecutive year Diversified Technical Systems (DTS), headquartered in Seal Beach, California, was named as one of the Best Places to Work in Orange County. The awards program was created in 2009 and is a project of the Orange County Business Journal and Best Companies Group.

DTS is proud to be named one of Orange County’s Best Places to work again. Our success starts with our employees and we’re honored that they have put us on the list for the third year in a row,” said Rollin White, Head of DTS.

DTS was named 27th in the medium-sized company category. The awards program works to identify and honor the best places of employment in Orange County, California, benefiting the county’s economy, its workforce and businesses. The two-part application process includes evaluating each employer’s workplace policies, practices and demographics, which is worth approximately 25% of the total evaluation. The second part is an extensive employee survey which measures the employee experience, and is worth 75% of the score.

As DTS has grown over the last 32 years and as the world deals with a global pandemic, it’s been even more important to continue to find ways to create an environment that fosters personal growth and wellness. “Encouraging creativity, initiative and a team spirit, along with our dedication to our customers, and to each other, is what makes DTS special,” added White.

About DTS: Diversified Technical Systems specializes in manufacturing miniature, rugged data acquisition systems and sensors for product and safety testing in extreme environments. DTS data recorders and sensors are used for testing in a variety of industries including automotive, aerospace, injury biomechanics, sports, military and defense. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Seal Beach, California, DTS also has technical centers around the globe and is part of Vishay Precision Group, Inc. (NYSE: VPG).

July 6, 2022

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Blast Test Dummy Assessment Tool Receives Stamp of Accreditation

Blast Test Dummy Assessment Tool Receives Stamp of Accreditation

Blast Test Dummy Assessment Tool Receives Stamp of Accreditation
DTS WIAMan Software AMANDA
DTS WIAMan Software AMANDA

May 1, 2022

In Iraq and Afghanistan underbody blasts from improvised explosive were the largest cause of injury for U.S. troops. In order to help make troops safer, the U.S. Army first needed a highly specialized test dummy that would allow them to gather the right data in a blast test.

That specialized blast test dummy is now a reality and is known as WIAMan, or Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin. WIAMan is specifically designed for military use in underbody blast testing of vehicles to validate vehicle design and safety features engineered to protect warfighters. As stated in a recent news post on soldiersystems.net1:

“WIAMan represents the most human-like surrogate yet to provide insight on improving military ground vehicle systems and identify protection mechanisms that reduce the likelihood and severity of warfighter injuries.”

Developed in partnership with the U.S. Army, DTS, and top universities, who were responsible for extensive injury biomechanics research, the WIAMan blast manikin measures vertical loads. A blast impact comes from below the occupant. Automotive crash test dummies are designed to measure only frontal or side impacts, which is why development of WIAMan was critical. DTS was the prime contractor and built both the manikin and the SLICE6 data acquisition system and then integrating them.2

This large volume of data is processed by analytical experts from DEVCOM (U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command) “to provide reliable injury assessment and analysis.”1

The WIAMan software analysis tool used is called AMANDA, or the Analysis of Manikin Data. And on Feb. 2, 2022, AMANDA received a final stamp of trust in quality and accuracy when it was accredited by the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command for use in live fire test and evaluation.

“The WIAMan data acquisition system takes samples from an event at a rate of approximately 200,000 samples a second, and the typical event takes a couple seconds, so we’re talking around 400,000 data samples — an incredible amount of data,” said Jacob Ehlenberger, AMANDA software developer. “When you load that into AMANDA, all subject matter experts have to worry about is looking at the results. AMANDA automates the entire process, bringing complex analysis to the hands of experts so they can focus on their domain of excellence.” 1

AMANDA also integrates filtering methodology, developed by Aaron Alai, a DAC signal processing scientist, to ensure sensor data does not reflect extraneous noise that could lead to incorrect injury prediction.1

The data produced by WIAMan, once analyzed, helps the Army to more accurately measure soldier risk and evaluate trade-offs in vehicle design. Ultimately this means reducing the likelihood and severity of warfighter injuries.

“Simply put, insight from AMANDA saves lives.”1

Resources

  1. https://soldiersystems.net/2022/05/17/army-injury-assessment-tool-receives-stamp-of-accreditation/
  2. https://www.aerodefensetech.com/component/content/article/adt/features/articles/27963

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DTS Promotions Announcement

DTS Promotions Announcement

DTS Promotions Announcement
DTS Employee Promotions April 2022
DTS Employee Promotions April 2022

April 13, 2022

Organizational Announcement in Vishay Precision Group / Measurement Systems / DTS

CONGRATULATIONS to everyone who has been promoted! Your talent is key to our global success!

  • AJ Ayala has been promoted to Quality Control Specialist/ EHS Officer, reporting to, Dana Tice, QC Manager.
  • Christopher Balogh has been promoted to Project Manager, reporting to Daniel Stelung, Director, Engineering.
  • Jacqueline Estillore has been promoted to Marketing Specialist /Graphic Designer, reporting to Shelly Horvath, Marketing Manager.
  • Jeff Romero has been promoted to Materials & Shipping Lead, reporting to Jessica Alvarado, Supply Chain Materials Manager.
  • Kimberly Stull has been promoted to Accounting Supervisor, reporting to Lail Hundertmark, Controller.
  • Kristina Fett has been promoted to Engineering Project Manager /Planner, reporting to Daniel Stelung, Director, Engineering.
  • Kyvory Henderson has been promoted to Sr. Manager, Business Development & ATD, reporting to Steve Pruitt, Chief Sales & Business Development Officer.
  • Michael Jackson has been promoted to Sr. IT Specialist, reporting to Mike Waterbury, IT Manager.
  • Patricia Damron has been promoted to Customer Service / Salesforce Specialist, reporting to James Shaw, Director, Sales, Marketing & Service.
  • Paul Levin has been promoted to Sr. Electronics Engineer, reporting to Frank Monaco, Electronics Engineering Manager.
  • Ronie Leung has been promoted to Sr. E/M Assembler, reporting to Maria Medina, Production Manager.
  • Sunny Adam has been promoted to Sr. Electronics Assembler, reporting to Greg Netherwood, Electronics Technician Manager.
  • Travis Ralston has been promoted to Technical Information Manager, reporting to Daniel Stelung, Director, Engineering.

Please join us in congratulating our colleagues and wishing them much success in their new roles.

Sincerely,

Rollin White
Sr. Director, Head of Global Sub P&L – DTS

Ann Cook
Director, HR

 

As a leading manufacturer of data acquisition systems and sensors for product and safety testing, DTS’s mission is to be the most trusted provider of measurement solutions in every market we serve. Knowing that our test instrumentation helps save lives – makes our work more than just a job.

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These Test Dummies are Going Places

These Test Dummies are Going Places

These Test Dummies are Going Places
CNBC video - The 1 Million Dollar Crash Test Dummy
CNBC video - The 1 Million Dollar Crash Test Dummy

March 31, 2022

Test manikins have come a long way. Anthropomorphic test devices, or ATDs, put themselves on the line each time we need their help. And that’s just what they’re designed for.

The creation of crash test dummies all started in 1949 when Air Force flight surgeon Major J.P. Stapp, who was studying “physiology of rapid deceleration,”1 wanted something human-like to test his rocket sled. The result was Sierra Sam. Built by a California firm, Sam was a dummy based on plaster casts of an actual pilot and had instrumentation in his thorax and head.

It soon became obvious that test dummies, like Sierra Sam, could be highly useful in the automobile industry. In 1966 Congress passed the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act and in the same year, an engineer named Samuel Alderson, constructed the first test manikin specifically for the automotive industry. The ATD was named V.I.P.

In an effort to take testing to the next level, General Motors had the idea to use the best of what was available. GM put a Sierra Sam head onto V.I.P.’s body. The year was 1971 and this was the birth of the first Hybrid dummy, Hybrid 1. Automotive testing with dummies led to many improved safety features in cars, from steering wheel placement to the arc of the seatbelt.

There were concerns, however, because all ATDs were based on the size of an adult male so there was no ability to collect data on female or child-sized occupants. In the 1980s ATDs that were closer to the size of women were developed, but these were simply a scaled down version of the male dummy, not based on a female’s biofidelity, which means the manikins did not respond like a human female body would in an accident.

According to a recent CNBC report “How Crash Test Dummies Evolved to Cost $1 Million,” 51% of drivers are women. Because many industries are still not testing with ATDs based on female bio fidelity, there are still concerns about the safety of all sizes of drivers and passengers. In fact, statistics show that women are 17-19% more likely to die in the same accident as a man, and 73% more likely to be injured.

But industries are evolving. In the 1980s, third-generation Hybrids, Vince and Larry, were developed. Today the Hybrid III is still a widely used manikin plus it’s evolved into a full family of ATDs including toddlers, children, a small female and a large male. There are even specialty manikins to represent those at special risk of injury including the obese and the elderly.

And now there is also an even newer frontal crash test dummy on the scene: THOR. THOR, the dummy highlighted in the CNBC report, is truer to life and moves more like a real person. There is also more advanced technology inside that helps measure these more true-to-life movements. For example, the DTS A64C accelerometer and DTS ARS angular rate sensor can be embedded in any ATD to measure six-degrees-of-freedom motion (like all the directions a head could move).

Today, it’s not just the automobile industry using crash test dummies. Originally Sierra Sam was designed for rocket sled tests. Today ATDs are being used for blast testing, helicopter crash testing and space flight. We have WIAMan, who is the first vertical load manikin and is being used to help keep soldiers safer. And recently a Hybrid III manikin named “Ripley” traveled to the International Space Station on the SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule. With a focus on astronaut safety, the embedded sensors in Riley captured data on the forces astronauts may experience during launch, flight, and landing.

As we continue to improve ATDs and the information we can gather from them, who knows what future applications they’ll be designed for and the places they’ll go. But whether we’re talking about driving on the highway or adventuring into space, we owe a lot to these versatile test dummies. You could even say we owe them our lives. And as far as what they go through to get us this valuable data, like Larry the crash dummy said in a long-ago TV commercial before slamming a car into a wall, “It’s all worth it to get people to buckle up.”1

Resources
1. https://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/20/magazine/who-made-that-crash-test-dummy.html

DTS DDR Data Logger - DDR Control Software for Helmet Safety Testing

DTS In-Dummy DAS Integration — Spine / Pelvis 

DTS In-Dummy DAS Integration Thorax - CNBC video

DTS In-Dummy DAS Integration — Chest / Pelvis

DTS DDR Data Logger - DDR Control Software for Helmet Safety Testing

DTS In-Dummy DAS Integration — Spine / Pelvis

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DTS Proud Sponsor of National Biomechanics Day 2022

DTS Proud Sponsor of National Biomechanics Day 2022

DTS Proud Sponsor of National Biomechanics Day 2022
National Biomechanics Day 2022
National Biomechanics Day 2022

March 22, 2022

bi·o·me·chan·ics : the study of the mechanical laws relating to the movement or structure of living organisms

Biomechanics investigates the broad expanse of biology in the physical world and it makes substantial contributions to basic biology and physics, medicine and health, human and animal movement and performance, biomedical engineering, prosthetics and human-machine interactions, among many other endeavors.

The Next Generation: National Biomechanics Day hopes to expand the influence and impact of biomechanics on our society. By teaching young people about biomechanics the goal is to expand the number of people entering the field of biomechanics and create more career opportunities. Careers in biomechanics will vary greatly and may include theoretical biomechanics science and the practical application of biomechanics in commercial, medical, industrial, and other settings.

DTS is proud to again sponsor National Biomechanic Day and the inspiration that it brings to students around the world. It’s a great entry point and exposure to the work that DTS has done over the last three decades in injury biomechanics. Biomechanics has been foundational for the development of the miniature 6DOF DDR recorder embedded in NFL football mouthguards to help track and improve player safety on the field. Groundbreaking research was also key for the development of the U.S. Army WIAMan Blast Manikin. Officially known as the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin, the ‘human response’ of WIAMan is based on extensive biomechanics and cadaveric research done in partnership with top universities throughout the country. Each university focused on key injury areas primarily in the lower extremities like the spine, pelvis and feet to create predictable under-body blast (UBB) patterns. 

“It’s a great entry point and exposure to the work that DTS has done over the last three decades in injury biomechanics.”

Diversity & Inclusion: National Biomechanics Day has had tremendous success in reaching diverse and underserved populations and has enacted extensive initiatives to expand this success. Among these initiatives are grant programs for Women in Biomechanics and Black Biomechanists, repeated from 2021 and new this year, programs for disabled biomechanists and members of the LatinX in biomechanics group. NBD has had excellent success in reaching diverse and varied groups around the world and we will continually expand this effort. As we say, Biomechanics is for everyone.

DTS salutes and celebrates National Biomechanics Day and the contributions of the many biomechanists around the world. To learn more about National Biomechanics Day and the participating laboratories, universities and high schools, visit The Biomechanics Initiative Sponsors.

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Biomechanics Forum March 9th

Biomechanics Forum March 9th

Biomechanics Forum March 9th

March 1, 2022

Hello Biomechanists Everywhere,

National Biomechanics Day and The Biomechanist are hosting the second NBD Sponsors’ Technology Forum, a symposium aimed to educate biomechanics researchers and practitioners about state-of-the-art technology.

For the 2nd year in a row, DTS is proud to sponsor NBD. Please join DTS and the other cutting-edge companies for brief updates on the latest instrumentation and technology available. This event is a great opportunity to explore new tools and resources to support your biomechanics science and applications.

Please join us for this VIRTUAL, educational session (free): Wednesday, March 9, 2022, 5:00 pm GMT (GMT Convertor).

Schedule:

5:00 | NBD Introduction to the Forum
5:05 | VICON / IMU
5:15 | Delsys
5:25 | Qualisys
5:35 | Novel
5:45 | Short break with The Biomechanist
5:50 | AMTI
6:00 | Motek
6:10 | DTS
6:20 | XSENS

Join the session and meet representatives of these vital companies and start to develop your professional relationships.

PS: 5:00 pm GMT = 9:00 am Pacific, 12 noon eastern, 2:00 pm Sao Paulo, 6:00 pm Berlin, 8:00 pm Minsk, 8:00 pm Moscow…

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Meet the Smallest Most Versatile 6DOF Data Logger Available

Meet the Smallest Most Versatile 6DOF Data Logger Available

Meet the Smallest Most Versatile 6DOF Data Logger Available
DTS DDR Smallest Versatile 6DOF Data Logger Available
DTS DDR Smallest Versatile 6DOF Data Logger Available

February 8, 2022

Ultra-small, ultra-light, ultra-low power and ultra-flexible. That’s the DTS DDR. One of the latest innovations from DTS, the DDR (Dynamic Data Recorder) is expanding testing possibilities. This standalone 6-degrees-of-freedom (6DOF) data logger measures both triaxial linear and triaxial angular acceleration and can be laid flat or curved around, or in, a test article.

This versatility means the DTS DDR can be used in a large variety of applications such as:

  • Sports/Biomechanics: embed on, or in, mouthguards, helmets, shoes, and gloves for monitoring strike and impact. The NFL is using mouthguards fitted with the DDR to monitor and help advance player safety.
  • Defense/Army: embed in protective gear including helmets, boots or packs to collect 6DOF data in the field and during training. The DDR technology is also being used to develop In-Ear Exposure Sensors (IEES) to Measure Blunt Impact & Blast Overpressure.
  • Pharmaceuticals & Manufacturing: Weighing only 2.5 grams, the DDR can be used to create a “golden” unit that has the same size and weight as the actual product. The instrumented unit can then be run through the automated assembly line or shipping process to record measurements such as shock and vibration.
  • High Value Asset Monitoring: can be used in package testing and safe transit of high value assets in a variety of environments and vehicles such as planes, trains, trucks, and cargo containers.

Designed to be embedded on or in devices under test without altering usage or test dynamics, this ultra-low power bare flex circuit with built-in sensors has non-volatile flash memory, a shock rating of 10000 g operating/survivable, and wireless inductive charging.

The DTS DDR, one of the most innovative data acquisition solutions available. Click to learn more.

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Driven by Data – The NFL Player Safety Revolution

Driven by Data – The NFL Player Safety Revolution

Driven by Data – The NFL Player Safety Revolution
DTS DDR Data Logger Sensor Mouthguard NFL Driven by data
DTS DDR Data Logger Sensor Mouthguard NFL Driven by data

January 28, 2022

Healthy, uninjured players are the backbone of football. And as technology advances, so do our opportunities to gain more knowledge through data that can be used to improve how the game is played, the gear players wear, and the environment around them. There are many ways the NFL and other innovators are now collaborating to improve the safety of players.

In 2016 the NFL allocated $60 million toward the Engineering Roadmap, a movement toward a better understanding of football biomechanics leading to the development of better protective equipment. Dr. Crandall who chairs the NFL’s Head, Neck and Spine Engineering Subcommittee states, “We brought together the leading researchers and biomechanics, and medicine. We’ve coupled them with innovators, designers that manufacture helmets, protective equipment, and sensors, so we can consolidate all the information and have transformational change in short order.”

Currently the NFL is working with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to build the Digital Athlete, which is a virtual representation of a player. This Digital Athlete can run countless simulations, be used to better predict player injury and, hopefully, help prevent injuries. According to NFL.com, Sam Huddleston, Principal Data Scientist at Biocore, the NFL’s engineering partner, says “”We’re leveraging computer simulation in order to generate injury reconstructions. That allows us to understand, why did this player get injured, and then identify the things we could do to change that outcome.”

To accomplish this, a tremendous amount of data must be gathered and then input. The data will come from a wide range of sources including medical records, video reviews, field mapping, practice and performance data, equipment scans, and innovative technology such as shoulder pads, helmets, and mouthguard sensors.

The mouthguard sensor program was launched in 2019 as part of the Engineering Roadmap. Mouthguards fitted with DTS DDRs (Dynamic Data Recorder) are playing a key role gathering data that will help inform the Digital Athlete, as well as the development of gear that will improve player safety.

The DTS DDR is a flexible data logger embedded inside the mouthguard that can measure impact forces, speeds, and directions. We are proud that our ultra-small, flexible 6DOF data event logger is being used to help improve NFL player safety.

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NFL-Funded Lab Building a Safer Football Helmet

NFL-Funded Lab Building a Safer Football Helmet

NFL-Funded Lab Building a Safer Football Helmet
DTS DDR for Helmet Safety TestingDTS DDR for Helmet Safety Testing
DTS DDR for Helmet Safety TestingDTS DDR for Helmet Safety Testing

December 2, 2021

A recent NBC News Exclusive with Lindsey Reiser went inside Biocore, a company based in Charlottesville, VA, to take a look at an NFL-funded project to build a better football helmet.

Biocore, is leading the way to improve player safety. by mapping out every concussion impact in the league, in order to recreate the impacts that happen on the field during play, inside the lab. After reviewing all the game footage, impact locations are noted, and that specific impact is then reproduced. Equipment including DTS’ SLICE NANO data recorder, ARS PRO angular rate sensor, 6DX PRO six-degrees-of-freedom sensor and the DDR (Dynamic Data Recorder) are used to measure the impact forces that a player may experience.

Concussions and head injuries have been a risk inherent in many sports. According to the reporting, in 2019 there were more than 220 diagnosed concussions in the league. In addition to the fact that repeated head injuries can lead to issues such as CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy), a degenerative brain disease found in athletes, or anyone who experiences repetitive brain trauma.

Reducing concussions and head injuries is a priority for the NFL. Jeff Miller, NFL executive vice president for health and safety, comments, “There is no finish line when it comes to the health and safety of our sports, specifically around concussions.” One of the goals of the Biocore project is to develop position-specific helmets to help protect against the types of collisions that are often associated with different team positions.

The DTS DDR is an ultra-lightweight, low power flexible data logger that can be embedded inside a helmet or mouthguard, making it ideal for collecting field data. The standalone DDR features six-degrees-of-freedom sensors that measure linear and angular acceleration, to capture the full rotation involved in helmet-to-helmet and helmet-to-ground impacts. The data helps quantify the different impact forces, which in turn helps in the design of a safer helmet.

DTS is proud that our technology contributes to designing safer football helmets to help reduce the risk of NFL player concussions and head injuries.

DTS DDR Data Logger - DDR Control Software for Helmet Safety Testing

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS — All of the DTS software packages include an easy-to-use interface for set-up, control, viewing and data export.
 

DTS DDR - Helmet Safety Testing

PIONEERS IN SAFETY — With roots in automotive crash testing, DTS data acquisition systems and sensors have been used for injury biomechanics and occupant safety testing for over three decades.

DTS DDR Data Logger - DDR Control Software for Helmet Safety Testing

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS — All of the DTS software packages include an easy-to-use interface for set-up, control, viewing and data export.

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Cool Space Applications Presentation Dec. 2

Cool Space Applications Presentation Dec. 2

Cool Space Applications Presentation Dec. 2
DTS Space Applications SAFE Association Presentation Invitation
DTS Space Applications SAFE Association Presentation Invitation

November 18, 2021

SPACE APPLICATIONS
Presented By: Mike Beckage Co-Founder & CTO of Diversified Technical Systems (DTS)

Meeting, Product Introduction & Facility Tour
Join us for drinks in Old Town Seal Beach following the event

December 2, 2021
4:00pm – 5:30pm at DTS
1720 Apollo Court, Seal Beach, CA 90740
RSVP to info@dtsweb.com
(Appreciated by not required)

For over 25 years, we have been a corporate member of the SAFE Association and supported this community through presentations and informational gatherings throughout Southern California.  I am pleased to announce that all are welcome to an upcoming presentation by one of our founding members, Mike Beckage, on December 2nd starting at 4 pm at our manufacturing site located at 1720 Apollo Court, Seal Beach CA 90740.  The presentation “Space Applications: Cool and Interesting ways DTS is impacting scientific investigations” will highlight several applications in space travel where DTS products have played an important role in advancing scientific research and human safety in space missions.

DTS is a member of the local SAFE Chapter One organization.  The SAFE Association focuses on safety within the transportation industry and has several regional chapters across the globe.   www.safeassociation.com

Everyone is welcome to attend this FREE in-person meeting.   If you choose to become a member, a $10 dues fee will be collected allowing access to a full year of meetings, informational sessions and events.

Kirsten Larsen, SAFE Chapter One President

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Full-Scale Nuclear Transporter Crash Test

Full-Scale Nuclear Transporter Crash Test

Full-Scale Nuclear Transporter Crash Test
Sandia Full Scale Crash Test
Sandia Full Scale Crash Test

November 2, 2021

Successful crash test meets major milestone for nuclear deterrence program
Article Written By: Manette Newbold Fisher /
Sandia Lab News Vol. 72, No. 20, October 9, 2020

A full-scale crash test involving a semitruck impacting the side of the first prototype of a new weapons transporter successfully took place at Sandia this summer.

Using the Labs’ sled track, rockets propelled the semitractor-trailer at highway speeds into the prototype, an over-the-road Mobile Guardian Transporter conceptualized and built from scratch. Data from the event will be used for qualification of the transporter and to better understand cargo response in accident scenarios for years to come.

This test met a major milestone for NNSA as part of the Labs’ nuclear deterrence program, said Gary Laughlin, Sandia director over the program. Eventually, the new transporters will replace the current fleet of vehicles that safely and securely move nuclear assets within the United States.
“Completing this milestone is one example of Sandia’s dedication to the Office of Secure Transportation and the nuclear deterrence program,” Gary said. “Very creatively and with the help of many teams throughout Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories, we figured out how to build a new trailer and complete a test that was flawlessly executed.”

Biggest crash test in decades

Crash tests at this scale using transporter vehicles have not taken place at the Labs for about 20 years, said Jim Redmond, senior manager over the program, adding that Sandia has never executed a test quite like this one at full scale.

“About two decades ago, Sandia crashed a truck into an immovable barrier, but this is the first time we’ve done a test in this configuration, where we took a truck at full capacity and propelled it down the track and hit our test article sitting idly at the end of it,” Jim said. “In two decades, you can imagine how much technology has advanced in terms of our ability to measure responses of the trailer and its contents.”

One purpose of the crash test, said manager Daniel Wilcox, was to ensure the new fleet of semitrailer transporters will be able to keep cargo safe in the event of an unexpected crash.

Sandia’s primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure and reliable. As part of that mission, and since the inception of nuclear deterrence, Sandia has played an important role in transportation, Jim said.

“The transportation mission is a critical component of an effective nuclear deterrent,” he said. “It provides needed assurance to the American public and our allies of the safety and security of our stockpile. You’ve got to be able to ship nuclear assets safely and securely or you don’t have a deterrence program.”

Starting ‘with a clean sheet of paper’

Sandia manager Barry Boughton was part of the team that worked on the previous fleet of transporters that have been in use since the 1990s. Following testing on additional prototypes in coming years, the current set of transporters will be replaced by the Mobile Guardian Transporter fleet, which is expected to be in service beyond 2050.

Barry said the transporter systems begin with demanding requirements that change with each fleet as technology and the operating environment evolve. From there, the design team begins creating a brand-new system.

“The Mobile Guardian Transporters are not an extension of the old trailers,” he said. “We started with a clean sheet of paper.”

Nearly everything that makes up the transporters is custom designed and built, with a few exceptions. It was a multiyear design effort to get to the point where Sandia could work with an external partner to build the road-ready trailer. Initially, the prototype didn’t have any electronics or finishing touches. Following the 13-month trailer build, the team worked for an additional six months assembling electronics before they began testing the prototype in normal and abnormal environments.

Normal environment tests included such activities as driving the transporter on the road while measuring shock and vibration response and exposing the vehicle to thermal cycling while measuring its response to various temperatures.

From January to June, the team prepped the vehicle for the crash test by setting up data-acquisition instrumentation and configuring and installing representative cargo. Setting up the channels was one of the most challenging technical aspects of test setup, said Kylen Johns, prototype project lead.

“We had a goal of gathering an unprecedented amount of data, realizing that it would be extremely difficult in such a harsh environment,” she said. “To reduce risk, we built in redundancy to the systems and included peer reviewers in every step of the preparation. We were crashing a semi into another semi, and protecting these super tiny, thin cables meant the difference between getting critical data or missing major objectives.”

During the test, more than 400 channels of data and video, including high-speed video, were collected, Jim said. Every sensor served a purpose and provided specific data that the team analyzes to make sure the transporter meets all requirements. The team will only build three prototypes, so every scrap of data is meaningful to the project.

Test day collaboration

The complexity of the setup required the multiorganization crash test execution team and other collaborating groups to remain “laser-focused” for months, Daniel said, to ensure the crash date wasn’t delayed, the test objectives were met and data wasn’t compromised.

The prototype was moved to the test site in June, where employees continued preparing for the crash in pandemic conditions, in the heat of the desert — running cables, fixing problems, soldering wires, setting up cameras, checking acquisitions systems and setting triggers.

On test day, final preparation started several hours before dawn. Around midday, the test execution team, transporter team members and stakeholders stood at a safe distance from the sled track and watched the crash take place. There was a lot of buildup to that point, Jim said, with the years-long effort resulting in a transporter assembly test that was over in a matter of seconds.

“I was glad to see the rockets fired; I was glad to see it was successful,” he said. “It was tense. The entire team, including partners from LANL and Lawrence Livermore, were excited and relieved. There’s a lot of pride among the team, as well as the government sponsors, that we are greatly increasing our understanding of accident environments.”

Karen Rogers, senior manager for Sandia’s validation and qualification team, oversees the group that designed and conducted the rocket-sled test. Karen praised the seamless collaboration between teams, saying, “We worked in partnership, and at times side-by-side, to create all the elements that led to this successful test. It was gratifying to see the results of that hard work and the teamwork that made it happen.”

Deadline met despite pandemic

Before the COVID-19 pandemic started to impact many Sandia operations in early March, activities were on track for the summer test, Daniel said. Threat of the virus understandably complicated work across the program, but the team came together to keep things moving forward toward the test.

“There was a feeling of, ‘What are the impacts of the pandemic on this test — and can we really do this?’” he said. “Even though the unexpected challenge of COVID-19 added significant complications to an already-complex test, the crash was executed on the precise day it was planned before the pandemic, with no delay.”

Because completing the test on time was critical to NNSA, much of the team continued working on site when about 70% of Labs employees started telecommuting in mid-March.

Sandia industrial health and Environment, Safety & Health professionals helped the team work effectively in close quarters by requiring masks, checking ventilation systems and advising on how to take turns inside the vehicle, Gary said. The team’s procedures set a standard for social distancing at the Labs.

“Years of effort from the entire team and our partners, punctuated by the final push in a COVID-impacted world, resulted in a successful test,” Daniel said. “We are delighted by and grateful for the effort of so many that led to such spectacular results.”

Sandia Full Scale Crash Test Photo
TRANSPORTER CRASH TEST — Using Sandia’s sled track, rockets propelled the semitractor-trailer at highway speeds into a prototype of an over-the-road Mobile Guardian Transporter conceptualized and built from scratch. (Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories)
Orion Space Capsule Drop Test DTS DAS onboard
OVERCOMING CHALLENGES — Sandia quality engineer Dulce Barrera, left, and systems engineer and team lead Kylen Johns coordinated with colleagues to mitigate the challenges caused by COVID-19 during preparation for a full-scale crash test that took place this summer. (Photo by Bret Latter)
Sandia Full Scale Crash Test Photo
TRANSPORTER CRASH TEST — Using Sandia’s sled track, rockets propelled the semitractor-trailer at highway speeds into a prototype of an over-the-road Mobile Guardian Transporter conceptualized and built from scratch. (Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories)

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New 6DOF In-Ear Exposure Sensors

New 6DOF In-Ear Exposure Sensors

New 6DOF In-Ear Exposure Sensors
Warfighter In-Ear Exposure Sensors
Warfighter In-Ear Exposure Sensors

August 20, 2021

DTS In-Ear Exposure Sensors (IEES) Measure Blunt Impact & Blast Overpressure

As part of an SBIR contract through the Defense Health Agency, DTS is developing in-ear exposure sensors to help protect military personnel. DTS is proud to share the abstract we originally planned to present in-person at the 2021 Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS), which was unfortunately canceled this year due to the pandemic.

Detection and measurement of potential injury due to blast overpressure and blunt impact have been priorities of the US military for many years. The DTS groundbreaking 6DOF blast dosimeter is much smaller and more accurate than any other system. Testing has proven that the prototype is able to both recognize and capture blast even at <1psi, a range not often captured by other devices. This dosimeter device is powered by a hearing aid battery and weighs <3g and can be integrated with other protective equipment like helmets, footwear and tactical headsets while remaining unobtrusive to the wearer.

MHSRS is the Department of Defense’s premier scientific meeting that focuses specifically on the unique medical needs of the Warfighter. The annual educational symposium brings together healthcare professionals, researchers, and DoD leaders. The original DTS Abstract was titled Standardization of Blast and Unconventional Exposure Novel Injuries – Developmental Efforts of In-Ear Exposure Sensors.

If you have questions or are interested in learning more, please contact Kyvory Henderson: kyvory.henderson@dtsweb.com.

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DTS Named Best Place to Work for 2nd Year

DTS Named Best Place to Work for 2nd Year

DTS Named Best Place to Work for 2nd Year
DTS Best Place to Work 2nd Year
DTS Best Place to Work 2nd Year

July 6, 2021

For a second consecutive year Diversified Technical Systems (DTS), headquartered in Seal Beach, California, was named as one of the Best Places to Work in Orange County. The awards program was created over a decade ago and is a project of the Orange County Business Journal and Best Companies Group.

“Being recognized as one of Orange County’s Best Places to Work highlights the importance of each DTS employee. A customer-first attitude and creative collaboration has allowed us to develop innovative test and measurement solutions for our customers worldwide and have good time in the process,” said Rollin White, president of DTS.

DTS was named 11th in the medium-sized company category. The awards program works to identify and honor the best places of employment in Orange County, California, benefiting the county’s economy, its workforce and businesses. The two-part application process includes evaluating each employer’s workplace policies, practices and demographics, which is worth approximately 25% of the total evaluation. The second part is an extensive employee survey which measures the employee experience, and is worth 75% of the score.

This is the second year DTS applied to the awards program and is honored to be recognized again. Over the last 30 plus years DTS employees have helped develop a culture of teamwork, personal growth, and a positive environment with a family spirit. “Dedication to our customers, and to each other, is what makes DTS special,” added White.

About DTS: Diversified Technical Systems specializes in manufacturing miniature, rugged data acquisition systems and sensors for product and safety testing in extreme environments. DTS data recorders and sensors are used for testing in a variety of industries including automotive, aerospace, injury biomechanics, sports, military and defense. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Seal Beach, California, DTS also has technical centers around the globe and is part of Vishay Precision Group, Inc. (NYSE: VPG).

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